Show/Hide

COVID-19 (new coronavirus): There is a COVID-19 emergency proclamation in Oklahoma City, with requirements for social gatherings and business activities. Visit covid19.okc.gov for updates and details.

Ron Norick

Dates in office: April 14, 1987 - April 14, 1998
Born: August 5, 1941

Ronald J Norick

Ronald Norick, son of former mayor James Norick, is the only Oklahoma City mayor to be the son of a former mayor and he is the third mayor to be elected to three consecutive terms.
Mayor Norick worked tirelessly to make Oklahoma City a player on the nation’s economic stage.  Under his leadership the City was chosen as a finalist for several large economic developments including a United Airlines maintenance facility. When other cities were chosen for these, Norick focused his efforts on winning passage of the five-year one-cent sales tax to fund the Metropolitan Area Projects (MAPS) program. 
City voters approved the MAPS projects and sales tax in December 1993.  The money collected was used to build nine sports, recreational, cultural, and convention facilities including the Ford Center, now named the Chesapeake Energy Arena, the Bricktown Canal, and a new downtown library--officially dedicated as the Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library. The completion of these projects in the ensuing years led to a renaissance of the downtown area and the adjacent Bricktown warehouse district.  New hotels, restaurants, and entertainment venues sprang up to cater to locals and tourists alike.
 Mayor Norick was an avid proponent of the maintenance and development of the City’s infrastructure, and provided leadership in the passage of General Obligation Bond Issues in 1989 and 1995 totaling over $374 million. The proceeds of these bond issues were used to finance projects included in a capital improvement plan formulated under Mayor Norick’s administration. 
During Mayor Norick’s tenure, Oklahoma City was twice named one of the ten best-managed cities in the U.S. by Financial World magazine and one of the ten best cities in which to do business by Fortune magazine. Oklahoma City was also rated the most affordable city to live in by U.S. News and World Report magazine. 
The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995, was a major blow to the downtown area as the Murrah building was completely destroyed and many of the surrounding buildings suffered extensive damage. Mayor Norick provided strong leadership during the rescue and recovery efforts and was recognized as an eloquent spokesman for the City during this difficult time. He was also involved in the redevelopment of the areas hardest-hit by the bombing and worked to ensure that the forward progress of the downtown area continued. 
Before and during his term in office, Mayor Norick was an employee of his family’s business, Norick Brothers, Inc., and was president of the company from 1981 to 1992.  He is currently the controlling manager of the Norick Investment Company, LLC and Chairman for the Oklahoma City University Board of Trustees. 
Norick was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2008.