Alive in the 405

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Alive in the 405 is our awareness campaign to help us find a positive outcome for every healthy, adoptable pet at OKC Animal Welfare.

Our Goal

Alive in the 405's goal is a 90 percent live release rate for the animals cared for by OKC Animal Welfare.

The live release rate is the percentage of animals entering the shelter that leave the shelter alive by reunification with their owner, adoption, or transfer to one of our many partner groups.

A rate of 90 percent is considered a realistic goal for a large community like Oklahoma City, where many animals in our care have serious injuries, illnesses or uncorrectable behavior problems.

A generation ago, the live release rate in Oklahoma City was below 50 percent. In recent years, it has surged to more than 85 percent. We need your help to get over the top.

How To Help

1. Adopt. Don't shop. If you want to welcome a pet into your home, consider adopting one of the homelessalive in the 405 logo animals at OKC Animal Welfare. Every adoptable pet is up-to-date on vaccinations, microchipped, treated for worms and spayed or neutered. We're open for adoptions noon to 5:30 p.m. every day but holidays at 2811 SE 29th Street.

2. Spay or neuter your pet. The best way to reduce overpopulation is to be a responsible owner by spaying or neutering your pet. We have a free spay-neuter program at OKC Animal Welfare for all Oklahoma City residents. Email awcommunityprograms@okc.gov or call (405) 313-1469 to make an appointment.

3. Volunteer. From kennel-cleaning and dog-walking to tasks that need specialized training, we're always in need of volunteers. See our volunteers page for details on how to get involved.

4. Donate. Our needs for supplies, medical funding and other important functions are only met through the generosity of donations. Visit our donation page for details on how you can help.

5. Foster. We need temporary homes for pets who need time to recover from surgery or illness, to grow big enough for adoption, to work on behavior issues or take a break from stressful shelter life. Check out our foster page for how to start fostering.