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Oklahoma City invites ‘Ideas 4 MAPS’

Post Date:10/11/2018 10:31 AM

Mayor David Holt and the City Council are inviting the people of Oklahoma City to submit ideas for a potential MAPS 4 and help write a new chapter in OKC’s transformative temporary one-cent sales tax program.

“As we consider how best to continue investing in our future, we want to have an inclusive conversation, and we want every voice to be heard,” said Mayor Holt. “It is time to talk about MAPS 4. It is time to dream big again.”

Submit your ideas in one of three ways:

  • On ideas4maps.com.
  • On social media using the hashtag #ideas4maps.
  • Mail a letter to Mayor David Holt, Attn: MAPS 4, 200 N Walker Ave. 3rd floor, Oklahoma City, OK 73102.

As you develop your thoughts, think about transformational ideas that will propel our City forward. Be as specific as possible.

“MAPS has changed our city forever, and we have the opportunity, perhaps even the obligation, to continue building a city that our kids will want to call home,” said Mayor Holt. “We have the opportunity to continue our city’s momentum and ensure that it is felt by all. And because of the powerful idea called MAPS, we can do it without raising taxes.”

Watch Mayor Holt’s kickoff video at ideas4maps.com for more guidance, background and inspiration.

About MAPS

The Better Streets, Safer City temporary one-cent sales tax that is helping to fund nearly $800 million in street repairs expires at the end of March 2020. To adopt a potential MAPS 4 plan and not increase Oklahoma City’s sales tax rate, voters would have to consider a package in late 2019. 

A new MAPS program would leave the current Oklahoma City sales tax rate of 4.125 percent unchanged. Including state sales tax, the overall sales tax rate in most of OKC is 8.625 percent (8.975 percent in Canadian County and 8.875 percent in Cleveland County because of county sales taxes).

The genesis of MAPS began in the late 1980s, when civic leaders were jolted by an airline’s choice of another city for a maintenance hub because its employees didn’t want to live in Oklahoma City. In response, residents chose to make OKC a better place to live.

The original MAPS vote in December 1993 funded the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, Bricktown Canal, Cox Convention Center, Chesapeake Energy Arena, Civic Center Music Hall, improvements to State Fair Park, the Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library, the Oklahoma River and Oklahoma Spirit Trolleys. It ultimately raised $309 million, plus an extra $54 million in interest also used to fund construction. The original MAPS also had a use tax, which was deposited into a maintenance fund for the projects.

The MAPS for Kids vote in 2001 funded improvements to every public school serving students from Oklahoma City, including 70 new or renovated school buildings. Of the $700 million raised by the program, about $470 million was used for construction projects, $52 million for technology projects, $9 million for bus fleet replacement and $153 million for projects in 23 suburban districts serving OKC students. The MAPS for KIDS use tax funded public safety vehicle replacement.

Every MAPS 3 project is either already finished or is under construction. Voters approved it in 2009. MAPS 3 raised about $805 million, well above the anticipated $777 million because of Oklahoma City’s strong economy. Its projects are Scissortail Park, RIVERSPORT Rapids and other Oklahoma River improvements, the Bennett Event Center at State Fair park, the OKC Streetcar, Senior Health & Wellness Centers, the new Convention Center, trails and sidewalks. The MAPS 3 use tax, like the MAPS for Kids use tax, funded public safety vehicle replacement.

MAPS 3 sales tax collections ended Dec. 31, 2017, with the current Better Streets, Safer City temporary one-cent sales tax taking effect the next day.

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Media Contact
Kristy Yager
(405) 297-2550 / (405) 863-2831
kristy.yager@okc.gov

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